Internet of Dreams

history and future, material and immaterial, real and imaginary, fiction and non: what does it matter when it's all internet?...
archive. about. by joanne mcneil (@jomc)

April 23, 2014 at 5:00am
{####} 2 notes

Various authors, including Jacques Vallée and John E. Mack, have suggested that the dichotomy ‘real’ versus ‘imaginary’ may be too simplistic; that a proper understanding of this complex phenomenon may require a reevaluation of our concept of the nature of reality.

— Alien abduction - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

April 21, 2014 at 5:01am
{####} 10 notes
In December 2011 I learned from a Google Alert that the Mexican Government had disrupted a plot they dubbed “Operation Guest” to smuggle Saadi Gaddafi, the son of the late Col. Muammar Gaddafi, from Niger, Africa to La Cruz de Huanacaxtle, MX under the assumed name Daniel Bejar Hanan. Investigators also discovered false passports and birth certificates with the surname Bejar for Saadi, his wife, and two children. Saadi was to assume the name Daniel Bejar Hanan; coincidentally my name is Daniel Bejar, and we also share a similar likeness. Utilizing this bizarre coincidence as a unique opportunity to continue my research into questions of identity, authorship, and geo-politics, I traveled to La Cruz de Huanacaxtle, MX to realize this story through documented site- specific performances in the safe houses, beaches and resturaunts Saadi was to spend the rest of his days in. (via Daniel Bejar - “Operation Guest (Pool #1)”)

In December 2011 I learned from a Google Alert that the Mexican Government had disrupted a plot they dubbed “Operation Guest” to smuggle Saadi Gaddafi, the son of the late Col. Muammar Gaddafi, from Niger, Africa to La Cruz de Huanacaxtle, MX under the assumed name Daniel Bejar Hanan. Investigators also discovered false passports and birth certificates with the surname Bejar for Saadi, his wife, and two children. Saadi was to assume the name Daniel Bejar Hanan; coincidentally my name is Daniel Bejar, and we also share a similar likeness. Utilizing this bizarre coincidence as a unique opportunity to continue my research into questions of identity, authorship, and geo-politics, I traveled to La Cruz de Huanacaxtle, MX to realize this story through documented site- specific performances in the safe houses, beaches and resturaunts Saadi was to spend the rest of his days in. (via Daniel Bejar - “Operation Guest (Pool #1)”)

April 18, 2014 at 12:11pm
{####} 1 note
Created by Sures Kumar, Pro-Folio is a portfolio website built from fictional identities of artists and designers. The project is a response to the “Scientific Hoax” brief at the RCA Design Interactions and theoretically can generate up to 690,903,803 trillion fictional identities with unique name and work combinations using data from various online sources. (via Pro-Folio - Online portfolios from fictional artists and designers)

http://pro-folio.org/

Created by Sures Kumar, Pro-Folio is a portfolio website built from fictional identities of artists and designers. The project is a response to the “Scientific Hoax” brief at the RCA Design Interactions and theoretically can generate up to 690,903,803 trillion fictional identities with unique name and work combinations using data from various online sources. (via Pro-Folio - Online portfolios from fictional artists and designers)

http://pro-folio.org/

April 12, 2014 at 5:00am
{####} 5 notes
Until a few years ago, the internet was the main (and often only) way to see Laric’s works, and those of sanctioned fellow artists. Before I ever heard of him, I would often look at VVORK.com, the influential blog he ran from 2006 to 2012 with Aleksandra Domanović, Christoph Priglinger and Georg Schnitzer. The set-up was simple: an art work or two posted daily, either by one of the four founders or (usually) by another artist. VVORK would ‘curate’ not only images of contemporary works but also historical ones, predating that now-orthodox usage of Tumblr, and still contrasting with exhibition-based blogs like Contemporary Art Daily. On a random day in 2009, these posts might include a 2001 tray installation by Brian Jungen, a 2009 work by Markus Schinwald, a 1967 piece by Les Levine, and the ‘Silhouettes’ series (Untitled) by Seth Price, whose 2002/2008 essay ‘Dispersion’ continues to be one of Laric’s conceptual cornerstones. Laric believes – like Price, and as Marcel Broodthaers is quoted as saying at the beginning of the ‘Dispersion’ essay – that ‘artistic activity occurs, first of all, in the field of distribution’. (via Frieze Magazine | Archive | Iconoclash)

Until a few years ago, the internet was the main (and often only) way to see Laric’s works, and those of sanctioned fellow artists. Before I ever heard of him, I would often look at VVORK.com, the influential blog he ran from 2006 to 2012 with Aleksandra Domanović, Christoph Priglinger and Georg Schnitzer. The set-up was simple: an art work or two posted daily, either by one of the four founders or (usually) by another artist. VVORK would ‘curate’ not only images of contemporary works but also historical ones, predating that now-orthodox usage of Tumblr, and still contrasting with exhibition-based blogs like Contemporary Art Daily. On a random day in 2009, these posts might include a 2001 tray installation by Brian Jungen, a 2009 work by Markus Schinwald, a 1967 piece by Les Levine, and the ‘Silhouettes’ series (Untitled) by Seth Price, whose 2002/2008 essay ‘Dispersion’ continues to be one of Laric’s conceptual cornerstones. Laric believes – like Price, and as Marcel Broodthaers is quoted as saying at the beginning of the ‘Dispersion’ essay – that ‘artistic activity occurs, first of all, in the field of distribution’. (via Frieze Magazine | Archive | Iconoclash)

April 11, 2014 at 12:17pm
{####} 5 notes
Everyone has seen the Windows XP desktop image called Bliss. It’s been ubiquitous for 13 years. And you’ve probably always thought that the serene hillside is kind of corny and probably fake. Nothing is that idyllic. But apparently it’s real! (via Charles O’Rear is the photographer who took the Windows XP wallpaper photo in Napa Valley.)

Everyone has seen the Windows XP desktop image called Bliss. It’s been ubiquitous for 13 years. And you’ve probably always thought that the serene hillside is kind of corny and probably fake. Nothing is that idyllic. But apparently it’s real! (via Charles O’Rear is the photographer who took the Windows XP wallpaper photo in Napa Valley.)

April 8, 2014 at 10:52am
{####} 7 notes
Paper replicas of internet routers, passports, subway passes and iPhones were among some of the gifts offered in China to departed loved ones during this weekend’s celebration of Qingming Jie, a day to honor one’s deceased relatives. As younger Chinese play a larger role in the annual holiday known in English as Tomb Sweeping Day, it’s become an occasion to look at what Chinese shoppers are thinking about most. (via What China burned for Day of the Dead says a lot about shopping trends among the living – Quartz)

Paper replicas of internet routers, passports, subway passes and iPhones were among some of the gifts offered in China to departed loved ones during this weekend’s celebration of Qingming Jie, a day to honor one’s deceased relatives. As younger Chinese play a larger role in the annual holiday known in English as Tomb Sweeping Day, it’s become an occasion to look at what Chinese shoppers are thinking about most. (via What China burned for Day of the Dead says a lot about shopping trends among the living – Quartz)

5:01am
{####} 239 notes
Reblogged from prostheticknowledge

prostheticknowledge:

Counterstrike Paintball

A Redditor has discovered a real-world replica of a map from the multiplayer FPS ‘Counterstrike’, possibly for paintballing. No one is really sure where this is - one thread points to being based in China, another that it’s based in the UK and put together in 2003 (!!!)

You can see more examples and follow the conversation at Reddit here

April 1, 2014 at 5:01am
{####} 6 notes

#RaceSwapExp

A number of women of color changed their avatars to make a point about harassment. Some people are even swapping images in #RaceSwapExp

March 31, 2014 at 7:43pm
{####} 2 notes
Reblogged from internet-of-bodies
internet-of-bodies:

SGT STAR: THE ARMY’S VIRTUAL GUIDE SGT STAR is your virtual guide to goarmy.com.  He’s here to help answer any questions you have about the Army.  Just type in what you’re looking for and he’ll find the information you need - fast.
The information you enter is to be used only for recruiting Soldiers into the U.S. Army and the Army Reserve.
Ask SGT Star

internet-of-bodies:

SGT STAR: THE ARMY’S VIRTUAL GUIDE
SGT STAR is your virtual guide to goarmy.com.  He’s here to help answer any questions you have about the Army.  Just type in what you’re looking for and he’ll find the information you need - fast.

The information you enter is to be used only for recruiting Soldiers into the U.S. Army and the Army Reserve.

Ask SGT Star

5:05pm
{####} 16 notes
For a while now, facial analysis software has been able to distinguish between the six “basic categories” of emotion—happiness, surprise, anger, sadness, fear, and disgust. If you asked me to do the same, I could probably do it. But when you drill down into complex, compound facial expressions such as “happily surprised,” “fearfully angry,” “appalled,” “hatred,” and “awed,” I’d probably blow a couple of them. This computer doesn’t. In fact, it can decipher between 21 different “complex emotions.” (via Computers Can Read Emotions Better Than You Can | Motherboard)

For a while now, facial analysis software has been able to distinguish between the six “basic categories” of emotion—happiness, surprise, anger, sadness, fear, and disgust. If you asked me to do the same, I could probably do it. But when you drill down into complex, compound facial expressions such as “happily surprised,” “fearfully angry,” “appalled,” “hatred,” and “awed,” I’d probably blow a couple of them. This computer doesn’t. In fact, it can decipher between 21 different “complex emotions.” (via Computers Can Read Emotions Better Than You Can | Motherboard)