Internet of Dreams

history and future, material and immaterial, real and imaginary, fiction and non: what does it matter when it's all internet?...
archive. about. by joanne mcneil (@jomc)

April 12, 2014 at 5:00am
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Until a few years ago, the internet was the main (and often only) way to see Laric’s works, and those of sanctioned fellow artists. Before I ever heard of him, I would often look at VVORK.com, the influential blog he ran from 2006 to 2012 with Aleksandra Domanović, Christoph Priglinger and Georg Schnitzer. The set-up was simple: an art work or two posted daily, either by one of the four founders or (usually) by another artist. VVORK would ‘curate’ not only images of contemporary works but also historical ones, predating that now-orthodox usage of Tumblr, and still contrasting with exhibition-based blogs like Contemporary Art Daily. On a random day in 2009, these posts might include a 2001 tray installation by Brian Jungen, a 2009 work by Markus Schinwald, a 1967 piece by Les Levine, and the ‘Silhouettes’ series (Untitled) by Seth Price, whose 2002/2008 essay ‘Dispersion’ continues to be one of Laric’s conceptual cornerstones. Laric believes – like Price, and as Marcel Broodthaers is quoted as saying at the beginning of the ‘Dispersion’ essay – that ‘artistic activity occurs, first of all, in the field of distribution’. (via Frieze Magazine | Archive | Iconoclash)

Until a few years ago, the internet was the main (and often only) way to see Laric’s works, and those of sanctioned fellow artists. Before I ever heard of him, I would often look at VVORK.com, the influential blog he ran from 2006 to 2012 with Aleksandra Domanović, Christoph Priglinger and Georg Schnitzer. The set-up was simple: an art work or two posted daily, either by one of the four founders or (usually) by another artist. VVORK would ‘curate’ not only images of contemporary works but also historical ones, predating that now-orthodox usage of Tumblr, and still contrasting with exhibition-based blogs like Contemporary Art Daily. On a random day in 2009, these posts might include a 2001 tray installation by Brian Jungen, a 2009 work by Markus Schinwald, a 1967 piece by Les Levine, and the ‘Silhouettes’ series (Untitled) by Seth Price, whose 2002/2008 essay ‘Dispersion’ continues to be one of Laric’s conceptual cornerstones. Laric believes – like Price, and as Marcel Broodthaers is quoted as saying at the beginning of the ‘Dispersion’ essay – that ‘artistic activity occurs, first of all, in the field of distribution’. (via Frieze Magazine | Archive | Iconoclash)

April 11, 2014 at 12:17pm
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Everyone has seen the Windows XP desktop image called Bliss. It’s been ubiquitous for 13 years. And you’ve probably always thought that the serene hillside is kind of corny and probably fake. Nothing is that idyllic. But apparently it’s real! (via Charles O’Rear is the photographer who took the Windows XP wallpaper photo in Napa Valley.)

Everyone has seen the Windows XP desktop image called Bliss. It’s been ubiquitous for 13 years. And you’ve probably always thought that the serene hillside is kind of corny and probably fake. Nothing is that idyllic. But apparently it’s real! (via Charles O’Rear is the photographer who took the Windows XP wallpaper photo in Napa Valley.)

April 8, 2014 at 10:52am
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Paper replicas of internet routers, passports, subway passes and iPhones were among some of the gifts offered in China to departed loved ones during this weekend’s celebration of Qingming Jie, a day to honor one’s deceased relatives. As younger Chinese play a larger role in the annual holiday known in English as Tomb Sweeping Day, it’s become an occasion to look at what Chinese shoppers are thinking about most. (via What China burned for Day of the Dead says a lot about shopping trends among the living – Quartz)

Paper replicas of internet routers, passports, subway passes and iPhones were among some of the gifts offered in China to departed loved ones during this weekend’s celebration of Qingming Jie, a day to honor one’s deceased relatives. As younger Chinese play a larger role in the annual holiday known in English as Tomb Sweeping Day, it’s become an occasion to look at what Chinese shoppers are thinking about most. (via What China burned for Day of the Dead says a lot about shopping trends among the living – Quartz)

5:01am
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Reblogged from prostheticknowledge

prostheticknowledge:

Counterstrike Paintball

A Redditor has discovered a real-world replica of a map from the multiplayer FPS ‘Counterstrike’, possibly for paintballing. No one is really sure where this is - one thread points to being based in China, another that it’s based in the UK and put together in 2003 (!!!)

You can see more examples and follow the conversation at Reddit here

April 1, 2014 at 5:01am
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#RaceSwapExp

A number of women of color changed their avatars to make a point about harassment. Some people are even swapping images in #RaceSwapExp

March 31, 2014 at 7:43pm
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Reblogged from internet-of-bodies
internet-of-bodies:

SGT STAR: THE ARMY’S VIRTUAL GUIDE SGT STAR is your virtual guide to goarmy.com.  He’s here to help answer any questions you have about the Army.  Just type in what you’re looking for and he’ll find the information you need - fast.
The information you enter is to be used only for recruiting Soldiers into the U.S. Army and the Army Reserve.
Ask SGT Star

internet-of-bodies:

SGT STAR: THE ARMY’S VIRTUAL GUIDE
SGT STAR is your virtual guide to goarmy.com.  He’s here to help answer any questions you have about the Army.  Just type in what you’re looking for and he’ll find the information you need - fast.

The information you enter is to be used only for recruiting Soldiers into the U.S. Army and the Army Reserve.

Ask SGT Star

5:05pm
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For a while now, facial analysis software has been able to distinguish between the six “basic categories” of emotion—happiness, surprise, anger, sadness, fear, and disgust. If you asked me to do the same, I could probably do it. But when you drill down into complex, compound facial expressions such as “happily surprised,” “fearfully angry,” “appalled,” “hatred,” and “awed,” I’d probably blow a couple of them. This computer doesn’t. In fact, it can decipher between 21 different “complex emotions.” (via Computers Can Read Emotions Better Than You Can | Motherboard)

For a while now, facial analysis software has been able to distinguish between the six “basic categories” of emotion—happiness, surprise, anger, sadness, fear, and disgust. If you asked me to do the same, I could probably do it. But when you drill down into complex, compound facial expressions such as “happily surprised,” “fearfully angry,” “appalled,” “hatred,” and “awed,” I’d probably blow a couple of them. This computer doesn’t. In fact, it can decipher between 21 different “complex emotions.” (via Computers Can Read Emotions Better Than You Can | Motherboard)

March 29, 2014 at 10:40am
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While there appears to be no visible legacy of Agloe, it still remains on some maps — poised, perhaps, as it nears its 100th year, to reappear. “Is it real?” Mrs. Fettig said. “What’s your definition of real? If it exists in enough minds, it’s real.” (via Seeking a Town on the Border of Fiction and Reality - NYTimes.com)

While there appears to be no visible legacy of Agloe, it still remains on some maps — poised, perhaps, as it nears its 100th year, to reappear. “Is it real?” Mrs. Fettig said. “What’s your definition of real? If it exists in enough minds, it’s real.” (via Seeking a Town on the Border of Fiction and Reality - NYTimes.com)

March 24, 2014 at 5:01am
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MediaMass is a gossip site / fake news generator. Among its pre-written stories is an article reporting the death of celebrity X is an internet hoax. It became a problem after Philip Seymour Hoffman and Paul Walker died.

March 17, 2014 at 5:01am
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What might an eyewitness or ‘proof’ mode look like?
This function – whether on a camera app or a sharing platform or social network – would need to be an opt-in mode that users select before creating or sharing their media files. On capture, this mode could incorporate and preserve rich metadata (for example, using the J3M standard) and provide ways to check file integrity. Or it could be a platform-based way of confirming that the data in a video matches the associated hash or was captured with an app that meets verification standards, or of indicating that there is additional metadata available from the creator or from a third-party site. 

Verification metadata could also be both embedded inside of headers of media files that are published to social media sites or private data repositories, and simultaneously published to an independent notary and escrow service. The notary servers would operate to publicly validate that a certain set of pixels and sensor data did exists at a certain time, and maintain the continuity and security of that verification as long as the media exists. With an escrow service, data can also be safeguarded through encryption and anonymity systems, to ensure that only the organizations or individuals meant to have access to the data are able to access it. While this all sounds complicated, it in fact, the entire complexity of the cryptographic signing and metadata publishing can be automated and hidden from the user, much in the same way that buying a coffee at Starbucks with your smartphone has been whittled down to a few taps. (via How An Eyewitness Mode Helps Activists (and Others) Be Trusted | WITNESS BlogWITNESS Blog)

What might an eyewitness or ‘proof’ mode look like?

This function – whether on a camera app or a sharing platform or social network – would need to be an opt-in mode that users select before creating or sharing their media files. On capture, this mode could incorporate and preserve rich metadata (for example, using the J3M standard) and provide ways to check file integrity. Or it could be a platform-based way of confirming that the data in a video matches the associated hash or was captured with an app that meets verification standards, or of indicating that there is additional metadata available from the creator or from a third-party site.

Verification metadata could also be both embedded inside of headers of media files that are published to social media sites or private data repositories, and simultaneously published to an independent notary and escrow service. The notary servers would operate to publicly validate that a certain set of pixels and sensor data did exists at a certain time, and maintain the continuity and security of that verification as long as the media exists. With an escrow service, data can also be safeguarded through encryption and anonymity systems, to ensure that only the organizations or individuals meant to have access to the data are able to access it. While this all sounds complicated, it in fact, the entire complexity of the cryptographic signing and metadata publishing can be automated and hidden from the user, much in the same way that buying a coffee at Starbucks with your smartphone has been whittled down to a few taps. (via How An Eyewitness Mode Helps Activists (and Others) Be Trusted | WITNESS BlogWITNESS Blog)