Internet of Dreams

history and future, material and immaterial, real and imaginary, fiction and non: what does it matter when it's all internet?...
archive. about. by joanne mcneil (@jomc)

October 18, 2014 at 5:00am
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The International Trade Commission is a federal agency that receives patent and trademark complaints about infringing imports, then directs U.S. Customs and Border Protection to seize good. For example, Gucci might bring a complaint about a shipment of knock-off handbags. The ITC would review the complaint, and then issue an order to seize the shipment.
In re Certain Digital Models is a case where digital 3D models of plastic retainers were sent “over the border” into the United States. The ITC found that the models, which supposedly infringed Invisalign patents, were “imported articles,” the same as actual plastic retainers or knock-off handbags. In other words, the International Trade Commission has conjured up a imaginary border checkpoint for the Internet.

— This Federal Agency Thinks Customs Agents Can Seize Files at Imaginary Digital Borders

October 17, 2014 at 6:53pm
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"A black woman smiling in the background of a group picture that appears at the bottom of every page of Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett’s campaign website is actually a stock image, photshopped in…" (via Everyone In What Looks Like A Group Photo On GOP Governor’s Website Is Photoshopped)

"A black woman smiling in the background of a group picture that appears at the bottom of every page of Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett’s campaign website is actually a stock image, photshopped in…" (via Everyone In What Looks Like A Group Photo On GOP Governor’s Website Is Photoshopped)

October 15, 2014 at 10:55am
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Alan Turing proposed that an artificial intelligence qualified as a capable of thought if a human subject, in conversation with it and another human, cannot tell them apart; the strange thing about the Eliza Twitter bot is it doesn’t come across as any more like a machine than those who keep repeating their points over and over and over, ad nauseum. It’s difficult to decide who’s failed the Turing test here. (via New Statesman | The ultimate weapon against GamerGate time-wasters: a 1960s chat bot that wastes their time)

Alan Turing proposed that an artificial intelligence qualified as a capable of thought if a human subject, in conversation with it and another human, cannot tell them apart; the strange thing about the Eliza Twitter bot is it doesn’t come across as any more like a machine than those who keep repeating their points over and over and over, ad nauseum. It’s difficult to decide who’s failed the Turing test here. (via New Statesman | The ultimate weapon against GamerGate time-wasters: a 1960s chat bot that wastes their time)

September 23, 2014 at 4:53pm
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Instagram users like Nikki steal images of babies and children off the Internet, give them a new name, and claim them as their own. Sometimes they create entire fake families. Others then interact in the comments of each photo, role-playing as they virtually feed, burp, swaddle, and even reprimand these virtual children. Some Instagrammers even portray themselves as virtual adoption agencies, where followers can request specific babies and toddlers they’d like to adopt—“Looking for a two-year-old girl with blonde hair, green eyes, and who is feisty”—and the adoption agency then finds a photo, usually without permission. Role playing ensues. (via The Creepiest New Corner Of Instagram: Role-Playing With Stolen Baby Photos | Fast Company | Business   Innovation)

Instagram users like Nikki steal images of babies and children off the Internet, give them a new name, and claim them as their own. Sometimes they create entire fake families. Others then interact in the comments of each photo, role-playing as they virtually feed, burp, swaddle, and even reprimand these virtual children. Some Instagrammers even portray themselves as virtual adoption agencies, where followers can request specific babies and toddlers they’d like to adopt—“Looking for a two-year-old girl with blonde hair, green eyes, and who is feisty”—and the adoption agency then finds a photo, usually without permission. Role playing ensues. (via The Creepiest New Corner Of Instagram: Role-Playing With Stolen Baby Photos | Fast Company | Business Innovation)

1:40pm
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According to the researchers, the trend of decreasing communication before a breakup was strong and consistent. Specifically, the amount of tweets to the partner in question decreased, the amount to other users increased, and the amount of original tweets being sent from the account decreased overall. This is, in effect, the communicative “stonewalling” that the researchers were looking for to indicate a looming breakup….
all this valuable knowledge about what breakups look like on Twitter just before they happen could be used to design a kind of “early breakup warning system,” which would certainly be equal parts terrifying and fascinating for our culture.

— What Our Breakups Look Like on Twitter | Motherboard

September 14, 2014 at 9:32pm
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The latest error arises from Facebook’s auto-suggest tagging feature, which is causing anyone who starts writing ‘grandma’ to be presented with a link to pioneering hip hop DJ Grandmaster Flash. (via Grandmas keep accidentally tagging themselves as Grandmaster Flash on Facebook - Lists - Weird News - The Independent)

The latest error arises from Facebook’s auto-suggest tagging feature, which is causing anyone who starts writing ‘grandma’ to be presented with a link to pioneering hip hop DJ Grandmaster Flash. (via Grandmas keep accidentally tagging themselves as Grandmaster Flash on Facebook - Lists - Weird News - The Independent)

September 12, 2014 at 12:16am
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Every year on #911 I post this photo hoping 2 return 2 owner. Found at #groundzero #WTC in 2001. Pls RT (via https://twitter.com/ProfKeefe/status/510267665597091840)
Update via laughforabs: she found the owner this year and all six are still alive.

Every year on #911 I post this photo hoping 2 return 2 owner. Found at #groundzero #WTC in 2001. Pls RT (via https://twitter.com/ProfKeefe/status/510267665597091840)

Update via laughforabs: she found the owner this year and all six are still alive.

September 4, 2014 at 5:00am
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=657UeODW178 (via @melissagira)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=657UeODW178 (via @melissagira)

September 3, 2014 at 6:35pm
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Verge video director Christian Mazza is an active Instagram user with 571 followers, posting as @mazza. But recently he discovered something weird: a copycat Instagram account, @eastlaine, that looked exactly like him. The account’s avatar was Mazza’s face, copied from his real account. Its first photo was a shot of Verge editor David Pierce, also copied from Mazza’s real account. It even had the same exact caption: “Early calls with @piercedavid and @joplinger #bts.” (via It’s your face. It’s your photos. Meet the creepiest kind of Instagram spambot | The Verge)

Verge video director Christian Mazza is an active Instagram user with 571 followers, posting as @mazza. But recently he discovered something weird: a copycat Instagram account, @eastlaine, that looked exactly like him. The account’s avatar was Mazza’s face, copied from his real account. Its first photo was a shot of Verge editor David Pierce, also copied from Mazza’s real account. It even had the same exact caption: “Early calls with @piercedavid and @joplinger #bts.” (via It’s your face. It’s your photos. Meet the creepiest kind of Instagram spambot | The Verge)

August 21, 2014 at 4:24pm
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But I had immersed myself fully into House, totally absorbed by what was and wasn’t Addison’s disease and porphyria and sarcoidosis (oh, the sarcoidosis!), and I didn’t think to make a less hilarious life choice.

And it happened.

I heard something outside the gym window and turned to see a pack of hipster boys laughing their asses off, with their cellphones out, taking pictures of me, recording video. I jumped up to try to stop them, but they were long gone by the time I reached the door. And I thought to myself, “Fuck. Shit. This is going to end up all over the Internet.”

I didn’t know that I was right until those two emails, three years later, asking “Is this you?!”

— I am the woman you laughed at on the Internet